Giti Tyres Big Test | Birthday Bulldog

 
 April 2020     MACK SUPER-LINER CLX64T 6x4 100 YEARS LIMITED EDITION   Story Dave McLeod Photos Gerald Shacklock

Giti Tyres Big Test - Birthday Bulldog

In one way, Christchurch earthmoving and demolition contractor Gerard Daldry is absolutely and utterly the kind of bloke Mack Trucks was thinking of when it decided to build its latest special edition trucks.

Then again…..he was also one of the most unlikely people to buy one of the 100 Macks (a mix of Super-Liners and Tridents) fancied-up to commemorate a century of Macks in Australia.

Daldry is a man who loves Macks. Simple as that. It’s a passion that shows clearly when you walk with him through his collection of Macks. Well, some of them anyway.

His recall of the full details of Macks he’s driven over the years suggests he’s borderline obsessive. Like, he can even reel off their rego numbers!

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Pirelli Trevor Test

It’s been 100 years of Mack in Australia and naturally, to celebrate it they’ve brought out a 100-Year Anniversary Super-Liner.

A couple of them have made their way to New Zealand and we catch up with one of them down in Christchurch at Protranz, with owner Gerard Daldry.

It’s an impressive beast with its 58-inch high-rise sleeper and full Australian 100-year customised King bulbar (with under-run protection). It comes complete with the full Aussie Ice Pack, but even on a warm summer’s day in Canterbury we don’t need it. 

Our job today is to bring back an excavator from out towards Lees Valley to the Protranz yard just down the road from the Christchurch Airport.

No visit to Protranz would be complete without a nosey around Gerard’s impressive collection of trucks, with many NZ-built Macks and an extensive range of parts, including several E9 V8 engines.

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Giti Tyres Big Test - Birthday Bulldog

In one way, Christchurch earthmoving and demolition contractor Gerard Daldry is absolutely and utterly the kind of bloke Mack Trucks was thinking of when it decided to build its latest special edition trucks.
Then again…..he was also one of the most unlikely people to buy one of the 100 Macks (a mix of Super-Liners and Tridents) fancied-up to commemorate a century of Macks in Australia.
Daldry is a man who loves Macks. Simple as that. It’s a passion that shows clearly when you walk with him through his collection of Macks. Well, some of them anyway.
His recall of the full details of Macks he’s driven over the years suggests he’s borderline obsessive. Like, he can even reel off their rego numbers!
He has an admiration for the brand that spans decades and a relationship with the recently-retired, long-serving manager of NZ Mack importer Motor Truck Distributors, Murray Sowerby (alias Mr Mack) that’s almost brotherly. 
The passion for the Bulldog brand shows when he runs through the Macks he owns – most of them collector trucks, not part of Protranz Earthmoving’s everyday working truck fleet (which itself runs to 30-odd trucks).
The enviable Mack lineup – amounting to about half of the Daldry collection of over 40 near-modern classic trucks (including Internationals, Bedfords, ERFs and Scammells) is heavily focused on New Zealand-built Macks. 
They range in age back to a couple of 1973 models and there’s a few rarities among them – the 1000th Mack built in NZ, the world’s last Cruise-Liner and the only CL model fitted with a Detroit Series 60 engine, among them. That was brought into the country by MTD for evaluation when the Mack V8 was being phased out – in company with Cat and Cummins-powered options.
And yet…..despite all of this Mack love, remarkably he’s also someone who’d never bought a new Mack in his life! 
Not till he decided to buy one of these new 100-year Limited Edition models (one of three sold in NZ – two Super-Liner sleepers and one daycab Trident tipper).....which is what’s brought us here, to Protranz’s Christchurch base: To get a taste of what these Centenary models have to offer.
And what convinced this Mack maven, this Bulldog buff, to break the habits of a lifetime, and buy his first brand-new Mack – a Centenary Super-Liner.
“I’ve bought dozens and dozens of DAFs, Nissans and Kenworths and things like that – but it was only because of one specific person in Mack Trucks in Christchurch that I didn’t like one little bit….that I didn’t buy new. 
“I always joked with Murray Sowerby that the day that guy f***ing leaves, you let me know and we’ll start buying Macks. Unfortunately, he left only just before Murray retired – so it sort of worked-in to be quite nice for Murray…..as he got a real significant truck for his last sale. 
“Plus he actually got to sell us a truck and we got to buy a truck (off him), which is probably more significant for us.”
So what exactly do you get in a 100-year Birthday Bulldog, on top of the Super-Liner’s usual 600-685-horsepower (kilowatts) 16-litre MP10 engine, heavy-duty mDrive automated manual transmission and the choice of either Mack or Meritor heavy-duty diffs and air or mechanical spring rear suspension?
The Protranz 6x4 Limited Edition Super-Liner tractor unit sticks to the all-Mack powertrain and suspension – the 685hp MP10, the mDrive and the 2370B diffs on Mack air suspension, with a Mack FXL front axle as well.
Well, the extras are really collector-oriented – and in keeping with special edition anniversary Macks that have gone before, including a Southern Cross limited edition in 2013, the Centennial trucks in 2000 and an Australian Bicentennial limited edition Super-Liner back in 1988. 
Beneath the gold Bulldog, which (as usual) denotes that it’s an all-Mack driveline, is a bigger, taller chrome grille….in front of a larger, more imposing bonnet. There are plenty of 100-year badges, plaques…even an illuminated cutout in the big, true-blue-Aussie King bumper and bullbars. It also comes with a distinctive dark green heritage paint job.
It’s luxurious inside, with more 100-year ID branding – on the panels and on the leather seats and trim. It’s flash alright inside the special 58-inch high-rise sleeper – all pleated ultra-leather burgundy trim, with red ambient floor lighting and a woodgrain dash. The driver’s seat is an ISRI Premium Big Boy with 100-Years embroidery – and there’s a matcher on the passenger side.
To this, Gerard has added his own personal stamp: “Oh yeah – completely f***ing changed it. I got rid of everything shiny. The fuel tanks are painted. The chassis, exhaust, everything underneath, is painted black. The bits that hang under the cab are painted green. Got rid of the chrome aircleaner tops – lowered them too. I got rid of the shiny shit. I like them to be a bit more basic – just to look like a working truck.”
And apparently there’s more to come: The personalised plate will be ‘I 4 AN I’ (yep, an eye for an eye) and Gerard will be painting up the rear outside wall of the cab with all the Mack logos from the past 100 years.
Macks, he explains, are what he grew up with – back in Ashburton. Well, truthfully, “there was only really one Mack….” And there were two Kenworths.
So, he concedes, “my passion probably could have gone either way, to be fair.”
“The first truck I ever drove was a TS3 Commer, at Burnetts in Ashburton. And then I got a Dodge and I thought that was f***ing cool. And then I transferred up to Farrier Waimak in Christchurch here and got an International with a V8 Detroit in it. 
“It was there that I first got involved with Mack. I was about 18 or 19 – and that was about 1983. We started getting those 180-horsepower R Model Macks coming into the fleet. 
“I thought ‘well shit! These are cool’ – and I ended up with a 200hp MC with a concrete pump on the back of it. KI 3245.” Yep, that’s the rego number!
Gerard proceeds to tell me his Mack driving history, which is impressive enough…but made even moreso because he can recall great detail about each of the trucks.
Here’s an example: “I picked up a 200hp R Model from Southern Transport – they had it transferred up here. I drove that for quite a while and that went on to become Capital Concrete Group’s No. 3, up in Wellington, JU3868 was the number plate. It went from Southern to Capital Concrete and then it went down south somewhere. Then it went to Kaikoura….it got rolled there and then rebuilt. A guy in Wanaka’s got it now.
“And then I got an R Model from a company in Timaru – IM9310 – and we painted that into Farrier Waimak’s colors and that was only the second gravel truck Mack that got painted into the blue – the colours that they are now. 
“NM4735 was an R Model that we got brand-new in Christchurch here and that was the first one to get painted into those colours here. Clive Taylor’s still got that in Paraparaumu, if I remember rightly.”
And so it goes – one Mack…after another. Some of them trucks that he drove years ago…and has since tracked down and bought – including a couple of R Models, two Super-Liners and two CLs 
It’s a helluva history of Mack in NZ – but, remarkably in the light of all this, the first truck he owned wasn’t a Mack!
He wanted it to be – and would have liked to have bought an ex-Dibble Brothers Super-Liner that he saw at MTD when he was there getting the Super-Liner he was driving at the time serviced.
He asked the salesman if he could fire it up so he could take it for a drive, but it wouldn’t fire. The salesman (which, he’s at pains to point out, was NOT his mate Murray Sowerby) suggested he come back in a week….
“So about three days later, I was in Auckland and I saw an S-line (International) for sale at Redvale Lime, so I bought that.”
The first Mack he bought, strangely enough, was a CH that, “the last time I saw it before I bought it, was lying on its side at the Paremata roundabout! It was a Hookers truck and some guy had rolled it with a container on it. 
“I ended up buying it probably four or five years later. It was a 400hp CH – one of the very original ones still had that R Model chassis in them.
“When I started my own company, which was in ‘97, I bought a Super-Liner off a company up in Wairarapa. We had a few Nissans that were working trucks, but that truck was my toy truck. 
“And then I found out about the 1000th Super-Liner there (he points to the truck behind us): This is the 1000th Mack built in NZ in the factory.
“After the Super-Liner, I bought an MC, because my first Mack (that he’d driven, not owned) was an MC. I bought that from Southern Districts Towing up in Auckland. I bought an R Model off them as well – both are around in our shed. 
“And it just went from there. As they’ve become available we started to collect one of every model that was built in Palmerston North. So we’ve sort of achieved that.”
So how many exactly? “About 20 Macks – actually, probably more than 20…Every NZ Mack has its original plate back on it.
“Size-wise the Titan’s obviously the biggest – it’s huge – and then the Ultra-Liner. Well, horsepower-wise, the Titan’s 610, the Ultra-Liner is 525, the CL is 525, the Super-Liner is 500, the Cruise-Liner is 440, the FRs are 375. They’re all V8s – all those ones. And then you’ve got 454s, and 350s, 285s and 237s. There’s three 337s and then they range right up to the new 685. 
“We’ve also got a few Macks in the other shed – like the CL with the Detroit in it that they built in America and sent out here. A few oddball things like that. 
“The FR is a 1982 with a 375 V8 and they put an Allison automatic in it at the factory. It was built for the Ministry of Works in Taupo, when they started the geothermal division.
“Guys like Murray (Sowerby) lived through it all – developing all this stuff. A lot of it has been developed just for NZ as well. It’s pretty cool shit.”
Believe it or not, he’s actually sold some of the Macks he’s bought over the years…. although not that many. Three of the older models were double-ups….and he let go a Super-Liner to a friend in the UK. 
“John’s a good bastard. He’s a real salt-of-the-earth guy….a good bugger. He owns a demolition company in Reading…. He’s sort of kept us going in this business that we’re in – the demolition. Not financially – nothing like that. Just motivationally.”
Anyway, he said he wanted to buy one of Gerard’s Super-Liners: “I said ‘well, you’re not f***ing having one! It went backwards and forwards, and he went upstairs – this is about 10 o’clock at night – and then came back downstairs and threw a big heap of cash on the table and said ‘now do I own it?’ I said: ‘F***, you own it alright….!’ ”
As for the Titan – that’s so huge you couldn’t miss it in the shed beside us: “We brought the Titan in from Aussie a couple of years ago because I quite like that bloody thing and it’s the last of the V8s. I’ve used that for the last couple of years. Been all over NZ in it.
“But unfortunately as you buy a new truck, you end up in that quite a lot. I bought the Ultra-Liner – and the Super-Liner stayed in the shed quite a bit. Bought the Titan – so the Ultra-Liner stays in the shed quite a bit! 
“Luckily I’ve got a few good mates that come down from the North Island at times and, instead of getting a rental car, they come and grab one of the Macks and use that for a weekend – just to keep them going, you know. 
“And there’s a few guys in Christchurch here from other companies that call in every now and then if they’ve got a weekend where they’re not doing much, and they want to go and visit friends in Oamaru or Timaru – they just come and grab a Mack and take it for a run.”
Does he have a favourite? “Mack-wise? No, not really. Probably the 1000th one if you had to put one on it but probably not really.” 
Maybe this new 100-Years Super-Liner? “Nah, because the Centenary one is an Australian truck, to be fair – and so is the Titan. The NZ ones are what we originally set out to do – just pick up one of every model that they made in NZ. Just to keep them going. 
“So the Aussie ones are cool and they’re all nice to drive around and all that shit, but the NZ ones are where I aimed it all at, at the start.”
He points out a couple of Titans, reckons: “These were sort of the end of Mack…. They’re Volvo now. Like, the Volvo influence has come into them. These V8 Titans were the sort of last of the…true Mack vehicles – engines and things like that.” 
In the midst of all this Mackness, he gives a shoutout to Kenworth importers, Southpac Trucks: “I might as well mention them – they’re absolutely faultless in what they do for us and the relationship we’ve got, so I wouldn’t want to step away from them too far. 
“But my guts lie with the Macks….even though we’ve got other trucks in the collection, the most significant ones are the Macks.” 
In keeping with the easy existence he’s got planned for his one and only brand-new Mack, today’s test isn’t exactly going to be the most taxing – certainly not in terms of tight, twisty roads, monolithic hills or rough roads. 
We’re only heading out about 60 kilometres to the start of Lees Valley Road, near Oxford. We will however, be picking up a decent load – a Komatsu PC300LC excavator that weighs-in at around 34 tonnes. Given that the Super-Liner’s tare is “about” 12.5t and the MTE three rows of four widening semi transporter “is probably 8t,” we’ll be at around 55t all-up for the trip back to the yard – and will be led home by a pilot vehicle escort.
Climbing up into the cab is a two-step, no-front-grabhandle process. It’s not difficult, but could be easier.
Inside, the dash and dials themselves are familiar Mack LCD displays with cool blue colouring, the backlit features including fuel, digital gauge readouts, trip info, maintenance alerts, fault diagnostics and so on. Plus this special edition also has a Mack 100-Years-branded 6.1-inch touchscreen infotainment unit.
The driver-aids include an AM/FM stereo tuner and CD/DVD player, onboard GPS including navigation, a reversing camera, USB port, auxiliary line-in connector, PDF reader and a UHF radio. 
The leather-wrapped steering wheel is nice…but lacks the fingertip controls that so many other new trucks have on the wheel. But, then again, everything is still all well within arm’s reach.
The sleeper is something special. It’s been custom-designed and includes one-off storage units, custom trim and a new bunk layout, plus an Engel 40-litre upright fridge, 24” TV/DVD, a microwave, LED lighting, an Icepack aircon system, a pure sine wave inverter, two 120amp batteries and a 12v DC charger. 
Gerard has already slept in the truck, when he drove it down from the North Island: “It’s a lot smaller than the Titan. I haven’t used the microwave, fridge or the tv yet.”
The 100-Years plaque on the turnout section of the dash also bears the year, 1965. Gerard explains: “You got to choose a year between 1919 and 2019 – a significant year for yourself….”
“So I picked 1965, when I was born. And they said in Aussie that ‘the chances are you won’t get it – you’ll get either of your other two’…..because lots of guys my age will be buying the bloody things.
“But I ended up getting 1965….. My second choice was 1972, which was when Mack trucks started here in NZ.”
We head for Oxford with NZ Truck & Driver director Hayden Woolston at the wheel. It’s an easy run, with the MP10 pumping out its 685hp/510kW peak power between 1500 and 1900rpm and producing 2300 lb ft/3118Nm of peak torque from 1000 to 1550 revs. With the TmD12AO23 mDrive 12-speed AMT doing the shifting it’s easy to settle in.
We’re quickly free of the airport-bound traffic and onto Tram Road, heading northwest, towards Oxford – cruising along at 80km/h in top gear, the MP10 ticking over at 1100rpm.
The big golden Bulldog in the centre of the custom bonnet helps Woolston keep it centred.
Through Oxford, at the start of Lees Valley Road, Gerard shows his manoeuvring skills in getting the Super-Liner and the MTE semi transporter turned around and backed a little way up the gravel road to where the big Protranz Komatsu awaits. 
The company has about 30 earthmoving machines ranging in size up to the likes of this excavator – Daldry ramping-up what had been a modest demolition business in the wake of the 2010 and ’11 Christchurch earthquakes. 
That side of the operation flourished, not least of all because of Protranz’s innovative (and globally award-winning) development of remote-controlled excavators for high-risk demolition jobs.
Gerard and the pilot vehicle driver have soon got the digger up the ramps and all chained down securely, ready for NZ Truck & Driver publisher Trevor Woolston to take the wheel for the drive back to Christchurch.
We ease away and turn back onto the tarmac on Ashley Gorge Rd with the mDrive in third – steadily picking up from 800rpm and 5km/h road to 10k and 1000 revs.
At 1300rpm the AMT decides to upshift to fifth and is ready to go again at 1200rpm, when an oncoming car has us slowing down to second, so it can safely go by on the narrow road. 
Once we’re clear, a steady throttle has the mDrive easily climbing gears again – third, fourth and fifth, each at 1200 revs, then a doubleshift to seventh at 1500 and finally on through eighth, to ninth….at 1400rpm and 40k.
It’s flat around here and there’s nothing to slow us for a while, so we end seeing the AMT take one gear at a time till we’re up to 12th, at around 70k. On a few bends it drops back to 10th, at 50km/h and 1300rpm. Out the other side, it’s soon back up to 11th gear, 1400rpm and 60k.
Approaching a 55km/h corner, the pilot calls to let us know the way ahead is clear, as we slow a little and, at just under 1000 revs, the AMT drops to 10th and 50km/h.
Inside the cab, all is quiet and comfortable, the all-Mack suspension – parabolic springs and heavy-duty shocks on the steer axle and Mack Air Ride on the diffs – doing its job well. Conversation is at talk, not shout level – with the MP10 offering a nice background soundtrack. 
At 56km/h, the mDrive pops back up to 11th, and we cruise along at 60k, the engine at 1400rpm. This is very easy on the truck and the driver.
Closing in on the State Highway 1 T-Junction, the Mack PowerLeash engine brake, on full, is reassuringly effective in slowing us down with no footbrake.
Pulling away in first, the MP10 engine seems to be barely getting into its work as the mDrive steadily goes up through the gears – again making most shifts at 1200rpm. With the last couple of changes at 1400 revs, we make it to 12th at 70km/h and 1400rpm…and cruise along at 1100.
Back at the yard, Gerard volunteers a bit more about his motivation in buying this truck: “I like the history behind the Macks – and the guys that are passionate about them are f***ing passionate about them. 
“There’s a guy, Steven Robinson in America – he runs the Mack Museum over there and he’s a good bastard. He’s another Murray Sowerby. It’s for those sorts of guys.”
Clearly this same passion for the product is part of Gerard too – and that leads me to the question I’ve been wanting to ask: Did he NEED this Centenary special edition truck?
“No, not at all – it’s a straight ‘want’…. For what it stands for, what it represents and for Murray Sowerby. I’ve always said I’d buy a truck off him and we did. Murray told me, ‘100%, this is my last truck.’ 
“We did have a joke after he left though: Murray had a knee replacement and I told the guys there that he didn’t come down to the right price so I had to sort him out – kneecap him…..and then we came to an agreement,” he laughs.
“It is about relationships: A brand is a brand. Some are better than others, but it’s all about how you get on with the workshop and how you get on with the sales people.” That latter group, he reckons, has to be good – “because, at the end of the day, you’ve got two lots of people you sell trucks to: You’ve got the people that own them and you’ve got the people that drive them – and they’re two totally different people normally.”
The Protranz Centenary Super-Liner isn’t exactly going to be used as a show-pony….but it’s not going to get worked hard either: “It’s not going to get used every day, but it still will get dirty,” says Gerard. 
“We’ll put a few kilometres on it and then let it live in the shed with the Titan and the Super-Liner – probably keep all three of them together. You just open the door and pick whatever you want. Like, I took the Super-Liner there to Invercargill…to Murray’s leaving do. I got back and I thought ‘now, this is pretty cool.’ ” 
The new Super-Liner does have a superstar job on its hands soon after our test run – hauling some of the staging for Elton John’s NZ concert tour.
“We pick up the concert gear at the airport here – it comes through our shed and clears biosecurity, then we load all the trucks, about 14 or 15 of them, and then take it to Dunedin. After that concert, it’s on to Napier and then to Auckland, and then back to Christchurch again.”
There is at least one other milestone Mack that Gerard would love to have in his collection. He explains: “There were two reasons for buying this Super-Liner. One was because I like an anniversary truck – I think it’s something special, something cool and all that sort of crap.
“But it was Murray Sowerby’s last truck that he ever sold – that was what I was really aiming for. Something pretty significant. 
“I would have preferred to wait until 2022 to see if they would release a 50-year truck for NZ – because Mack Trucks is 50 years old in NZ in two years’ time, and it would be real nice if they build a 50-year one.”
In the wake of the passionate Sowerby’s retirement, he’s left wondering if it’s likely to happen: “I think it’s 50/50 if they will make one really.”
But he’s still hoping: “I’d have to have it.”  

Pirelli Trevor Test

It’s been 100 years of Mack in Australia and naturally, to celebrate it they’ve brought out a 100-Year Anniversary Super-Liner.
A couple of them have made their way to New Zealand and we catch up with one of them down in Christchurch at Protranz, with owner Gerard Daldry.
It’s an impressive beast with its 58-inch high-rise sleeper and full Australian 100-year customised King bulbar (with under-run protection). It comes complete with the full Aussie Ice Pack, but even on a warm summer’s day in Canterbury we don’t need it. 
Our job today is to bring back an excavator from out towards Lees Valley to the Protranz yard just down the road from the Christchurch Airport.
No visit to Protranz would be complete without a nosey around Gerard’s impressive collection of trucks, with many NZ-built Macks and an extensive range of parts, including several E9 V8 engines. 
We tag-team the test drive, with my son Hayden running out empty to the pickup, while I take it back loaded. 
Climbing up into the cab, we encounter the same issue we came across when we tested the Fulton-Hogan Mack down in Cromwell – no lower right-hand grabrail…and far less than a 90-degree-opening door. 
Steps are fine, with two inset into the tank giving plenty of depth and width, then a long platform step at the top giving good access into the cab. With no lower right hand grabrail, you use the door pocket from the ground – then use the upper door pillar grabhandle once you’re on the second step.
Once in the cab there’s plenty of room to get comfortable, with a top-of-the-range ISRI Premium Big Boy driver’s seat, plus a matching passenger seat.
There’s no gearstick to have to move around to get into the sleeper box and it makes for a nice open feeling in the cab. A flat floor adds to the ease of internal cab access.
The custom-designed 100-year special sleeper includes comprehensive storage, custom trim and bunk layout and a handful of other driver-pampering extras.
The dash layout is very traditional, with tachometer and speedo right in front of the driver, surrounded by various engine function gauges and a central Co-Pilot dash display with various operational information. 
Over to the left, in the centre of the cab, are the additional controls including the 100-Year touchscreen infotainment unit that includes a wide range of functions. Above it is the AMT gear selection panel which we have criticised in the past for its distance from the driver…and below it is the climate control unit. 
Various other switches are located to the right of this section of the dash, closer to the driver, including those controlling the Mack PowerLeash engine brake, wipers and traction control. 
After our recent drive in a Volvo with somewhat shared heritage it’s disappointing that there are so few controls on the steering column and wheel. The only stalk controls are indicators and lights to the left and cruise control to the right. All other controls are located on the central dash and require the driver to take his line of sight away from the road to locate them. 
Steering adjustment took some figuring out, till we found a small pedal above the throttle pedal. It allowed a very good range of adjustment. This, combined with one of the best seats in the industry, make for a very comfortable driving position. 
Once on the road we find the steering well weighted and giving a very good feel for the road, with very little correction needed to hold a good line on what are quite narrow roads (specially once the transporter has been widened).
Mirrors are the traditional West Coaster setup – motorised and heated, with a small circular convex mirror mounted under the left hand side mirror. 
Throttle response is very positive and smooth, with power from the 16-litre Mack MP10 coming through. It’s got 685hp at 1500 to 1900rpm and 2300 lb ft of torque at 1000-1550rpm, so no wonder there’s plenty under the throttle. 
Once loaded you can certainly feel the weight, but this just makes the engine dig in harder and you certainly don’t have to bury the boot to make it go. 
The Mack mDrive AMT delivers this power to the road smoothly without any need to consider going into manual mode. As I wind my way out from our pickup point, on a narrow road with plenty of double yellow lines, I’m certainly thankful for our pilot vehicle, clearing the road ahead of us. But even then, I’m constantly on and off the throttle and the mDrive is regularly shifting up and down. 
Noise levels inside this heavy hauler are extremely quiet with conversation in the cab at normal voice levels.
Ride is also great, both empty and loaded. However, it has to be said that the road out to Oxford and back is very straight and smooth.
Vison out of the cab is dominated by the big customised Super-Liner bonnet, however (as in the past in these trucks) it is easy to judge where the edge of the road is and keep the truck nicely positioned on these narrow roadways.
The gold Bulldog denotes that this truck is 100% Mack all the way through and this brings to mind the combined heritage of the Mack and Volvo brands and the strong, combined engine and transmission development shared by both brands – making them a leading driveline performer in the world truck market. 
There’s no missing the message that this is a 100-Year anniversary special, with its customised bonnet and grille, the big sleeper, the branding inside and out etc.
It’s one of those trucks that you really get a buzz out of driving – and we both feel very comfortable slipping in behind the wheel. 
This truck will not be one of Gerard’s frontline fleet trucks – just doing the occasional job. There’s another one of these 100-Year special edition trucks going into Silverdale operator Skip Golden’s fleet – and it will probably end up in a similar role. So you’ll have to keep your eyes peeled to catch a glimpse of these impressive beasts out on the highways.  

Marsh
Roadmaster